Age UK creates map showing likelihood of loneliness for 1 MILLION older people

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Age UK is the country’s largest charity dedicated to helping everyone make the most of later life. It campaigns on different issues from calling for reform of the care system to trying to improve the bus route in local communities. Age UK has been exploring what factors make older people more at risk of loneliness and whether people with similar risk levels live near each other. We spoke to research adviser Susan Davidson about the project and how the charity used interactive mapping software to create a map showing risk of loneliness.

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How to upload your own map in InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder – Video tutorial

InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder allows you to create highly-interactive dashboards with an exciting range of charts, tables and maps. In this video tutorial Joyce Luk, from the IA support team, explains how you can upload your own map in InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder.

So sit back and let Joyce help you get the most out of InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder.

Video transcription

Welcome to this video on how to upload your own map in Dashboard Builder

In InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder, you can upload your own map data to create dashboards, so you are not limited to the maps available from the Core Maps folder. The supported map data formats for upload in Dashboard Builder are shapefile and CSV. In this video we will upload a shapefile and a CSV file to be used as maps in Dashboard Builder.

For those who are not familiar with a shapefile, a shapefile is basically a popular geospatial vector data format for storing the location, shape, and attributes of geographic features. It looks something like this. This is a shapefile of the London Districts. It has several files that shares the same name but with different extensions. To upload a shapefile into Dashboard Builder, we would need to zip all the shapefile’s constituent files to a single zip folder first. Then go to the Maps tab, click Upload, navigate to the zip folder containing the shapefile and double click to open it. Now the map has been uploaded, we can preview the map by clicking on the preview button to double check if the map looks okay. A shapefile also has an associated attributes table, to view the table, click the table button in the map icon. Now let’s go back to the Maps tab and upload a CSV file instead.

In Dashboard Builder, you can upload a CSV file containing longitude and latitude decimal values of the geographic features. The CSV file will then be converted to a point map and stored in the Maps tab. Here is a CSV file containing the coordinates of the centre of the London Districts. The data headers are saved in the first row. Note the longitude and latitude decimal values must be separated into two individual columns. We will also need to have a column containing the unique feature IDs, like the CODE column here and another column to be used as the feature names, like the NAME column here.

To upload the CSV file as a map, go to the Maps tab, click Upload, navigate to the CSV file on the computer and double click to open it. We are now in the Choose Coordinate Columns dialog, here we will specify which CSV columns are used to plot the longitude and latitude coordinates for the point map. Then click Ok. Once the point map has been created in the Maps tab, we can click the preview button to preview the point map.

We will now create a dashboard using the map that we have just uploaded. On the Maps tabs, navigate to the London Districts point map, then click the dashboard button. On the New Dashboard dialog, we can rename the dashboard title to something more appropriate. We will also need to choose which of the map attributes table columns is used as the Feature ID and Feature Name for the dashboard. Note the column picked for the Feature ID must be unique so the feature can be identified individually. Now click Create. A dashboard will be created with our chosen map and onto the editor page.

Thank you for watching this video. If you would like to learn more on how to use Dashboard Builder, please continue to watch our next video on how to upload your own dashboard data.

Why choose InstantAtlas Online? see our video

 

Interactive online maps bring 2016 London election results to life

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Interactive online mapping reveals how the results of the London Mayoral and Assembly elections played out

The London Mayoral and Assembly elections may seem like a distant memory, but for anyone who wants to get a better understanding of how the results played out in each ward, an interactive online map is now available showing results at three different levels.

Data for wards, boroughs, and constituencies is presented using maps and charts in an InstantAtlas report. The 2016 maps contain more detailed data at constituency level than in previous years as well as a table showing how the London-wide assembly seats were allocated.

Election data is available from 2000 to 2016 for constituency and borough level which means it is possible to carry out a time series analysis. However, it is worth noting that due to boundary changes, 2016 ward level data is not comparable with previous years’ data. You can find the map here:

http://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/26865254-6aeb-4f7a-a29b-8c0ca064824b

Find out how the Greater London Authority has used InstantAtlas to present information on ward profiles:

How data visualisation is helping the Greater London Authority meet its objectives Background. The Greater London Authority (GLA) is a strategic authority with a …

 

 

How to use InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder – Video tutorial

InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder allows you to create highly interactive dashboards with an exciting range of charts, tables and maps. In this video tutorial Joyce Luk, from the IA support team, explains some of the most important features and concepts of Dashboard Builder which will help you to create a beautiful and interactive data visualization.

So sit back and let Joyce help you get the most out of InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder.

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Video transcription

Hello, everyone. Welcome to InstantAtlas Dashboard Builder online tutorial. My name is Joyce Luk. I am part of the support team at GeoWise in the UK. Today I’ll be going through some of the basics of using Dashboard Builder with you. If you haven’t created a dashboard yet, or are just getting started, then you are at the right place. I hope this tutorial will help you create a dashboard with you own data and map.

So first things first. What is Dashboard Builder? Dashboard Builder is a cloud-based app that allows you to create a dashboard with high-engaging data visualization online. So you might wonder, what is a dashboard? A dashboard is essentially a web page made up of individual widgets that allow the end users to interact dynamically. The best way to explain this to you is to show you an example dashboard I’ve created for this tutorial. Here I have got a dashboard which uses the map and dummy data for the US states. Each individual box here is the widgets.

As the creator of this dashboard, I can choose what widgets I want to show. For example, I’ve got a map widget here, a legend, a pie chart, a bar chart, and a data table. They are currently showing the indicator data, The end users can choose to display a different indicator by clicking on their Data button to open up the Data Explorer widget, and then select a different indicator from the list. As you can see, all the widgets will now populate the data values of the selected indicator.

When I click on a map feature, for example, Arizona, the data value of Arizona is now highlighted in each of the widgets. And if I clear the data and click on Florida in a data table, the map will automatically zoom into Florida. It is these interactions between different widgets that make otherwise static data more engaging and visually appealing to the end users. Now I have shown you what dashboard is.

I’m going to show you how to log in to Dashboard Builder and create a dashboard. To log into Dashboard Builder, go to dashboards.instantatlas.com. Click Sign In and then Email, and then use you InstantAtlas online account email address and password to sign in. You should see a landing page like this. Click on the Dashboard Builder button to open the app. I am now in the Dashboard Builder landing page. You can see that are four tabs, which I refer them as folders, since they basically store different types of files in the Dashboard Builder accounts.

The first one is called Dashboards, where it stores all the dashboards that have been created. You can see there are quite a few here. The second one is called Maps, where it stores all the digital maps available to you that can be used to create a dashboard. The third folder is called Data, where it stores the data files you’ve uploaded that can then be linked to a dashboard. 74 The last folder is called Images, where it contains all the PNG or JPEG images you’ve uploaded. I’m going to show you how to upload a map and a data file in the respective folder.

And I’m going to start with the Maps folder, since the dashboard can only be created if there is a map. 80 In the Maps folder, you should see a subfolder called  Core  Maps. Here you can find a collection of commonly used maps, such as the world map. And in the UK maps folder, we have maps such as the Westminster Parliamentary Constituencies, wards, [INAUDIBLE] for England, and many more. If you couldn’t find a map that you’re looking for, you can upload a map yourself. And if you don’t know where you could get hold of a map, don’t worry.

Please do contact us at Support@InstantAtlas.com. And we will be able to help you find a map. 94 The map that can be uploaded onto the Dashboard Builder has to be in a shape  file format. A  shape  file is a common digital map format. 97 Although its name implies it’s a single file, it actually contains multiple files with different extensions that share the same file name. Here I have a  shape  file for Louisiana Parish, which I’m going to upload into my Dashboard Builder account. Before I can upload the  shape  file into my account, I need to zip the files first. Now that the files are zipped, I can direct the zip folder to the upload button in the Maps folder.

Now that the map is uploaded into the Maps folder, I can’t preview the map by clicking on the Map button to open up the Preview dialog. I can also click on the Table button to open the table showing the attributes of the Map feature. Here, the map has two column views. The first one contains the codes for each parish. And the second one contains the names of the parish. Now I’ve going to use the map to create a dashboard.

To do that, simply click on the desk top button and the map menu. A dialog will open asking me to specify the name of the dashboard, and assign a column field from the map to be used as the feature ID and feature name. A dashboard is now created with the uploaded map. We are now in the Dashboard Editor. There is a manual at the top. You can toggle between the preview and edit mode of the dashboard by clicking this button. In the edit mode, you can move the widgets around. Or delete them with the cross buttons at the top right corner. And in a preview mode, you can see how the widgets will look like in front of the end users.

To add widgets, click on the Widgets button, and then select the widgets you wish to add. The property panel of the widget is to the left. It shows all the settings of the selected widgets. You can select widgets by clicking on the widgets itself, or go to the Properties panel, click on the Select button, and select the widgets from the list. To save a dashboard, you can click on the Save button. The Style and Legend settings for the dashboard are listed in the Styling and Legend tabs.

With a simple click, you can change the design of the dashboard. For example, you can specify the color scheme of the dashboard in the Styling tab. To open the color scheme dialog, click on the Color Scheme button here. Select a color from the color swatch, and then choose one of the options at the bottom. You should see the colors for the buttons, the widget headers, and the panels have all been changed. You can also specify the color of the legend with a simple click. Go to the Legend tab, and then select a color scheme. You can refer the legend colors with this Refers button, Or use the minus or plus buttons here to delete or add the number of classes.

You can see the effect on the legend straightaway here. There is so much you can do with the dashboard, which I’m not able to run through the functions here. If you need to find more information on Dashboard Builder, I would suggest you to have to look at the online help. You can access the online help by clicking the link here. If you cannot find what you’re looking for in the online help page, then please by all means get in touch with us at support@instanceatlas.com. Our next step in this tutorial is to associate data to this dashboard.

For this I would need to get out of this dashboard first, and explain a bit about the Data tab in the landing page. So I’m going to save the dashboard first by clicking Save here. And I’m going to click down to get out. And now I’m going to move to the data tab. You can see I’ve already got quite a few CSV files here. Dashboard Builder allows you to upload a CSV file with tabular data. Here I’ve got a file with dummy data for Louisiana parish dashboard. If you remember earlier where I have assigned the Louisiana parish code as the feature ID, this column will be used as the common identifier to link the dashboard and the CSV file together. It needs to be set as the first column in the CSV file. The column which is used as the feature names will be the second column in the CSV file. The third column is where I’m going to start to input my indicator data.

Here I have two indicators, each with three different years– I have used a pipe symbol to separate the indicator name and the dates in the header. The reason I do this is because when I upload this onto the Dashboard Builder account, it will automatically recognize the time series data for each indicator. Now I’m going to drag the CSV file over to Upload button to upload it into the data tab. It has now been uploaded. And I can preview the data by clicking at the table button here. I’m happy with that now.

So I will now open the dashboard again and link the CSV file to it. Now that we’re in the dashboard tab, hover over the dashboard, and then click on the notepad button to open up the Dashboard Editor. Once we are in the Dashboard Editor, click on the data button to open up the Data Manager dialog. In this dialog there are two panels. The source data on the left shows all the source data files associated to the dashboard. It currently displays the column fields associated with the Louisiana parish map.

The data model panel to the right displays the current data structure of the dashboard. In here it tells me that the  coats  field is used as the feature ID. And the Names field is used as feature names. To link the CSV file to this dashboard, click the CSV button, and Choose CSV File. Select the Louisiana parish  rec  book. Click Choose, and then Next. You can see all the CSV columns are now listed here. Click Finish. And they are now copied into their source data panel. I’m going to replace the current data structure with the data from the CSV file.

Before I do that, I’ll click on the Clear button to clear the current data structure. And then to I’m going to rename the theme. Now I’m going to use the Shift key to select multiple indicators, and then drag to the data model, and put them under the Health theme. I’m going to rename the indicator. Here is the indicator date box. You can see the dates have already been filled for me. This is because I have used a pipe  symbol in the CSV field header.

And this box is where I specify the indicator data type. I can choose between the numeric or categoric data. Since this indicator is numeric, so I’m going to leave it as it is, and click Save. Now that I’m happy with the data structure, I’m going to click on Apply. You can see that the dashboard is now updated with the new data. I’m going to want to replace the bar charts with the time series charts to better showcase the time series data.

Now I’m happy with the dashboard. It’s time to share it to the world. Up until now, the dashboard is private, which means only the author can view it. So you will need to make the dashboard public for others to view it. First I’m going to save the dashboard. And now I’m going to click Done to get back to the landing page. Once we’re in the dashboards tab, hover over the dashboard and click on the cartwheel button. This will open up the dashboard properties dialog.

To share the dashboard, click Share. And if you want to allow other InstantAtlas online uses to save a copy of the disk dashboard, then click Allow Save as Box, and then click Apply. You can view this dashboard by clicking on the eye button. This dashboard, it can now be viewed by anyone. And you can share this dashboard by giving out the URL link here. The URL link it can also be retrieved by clicking on the Share button here. I have now covered all the basics of Dashboard Builder.

Thank you for joining me in this tutorial. I hope you have found it useful, and got all the information to help you getting started.

Thank you.

Local Government Chronicle, the title for senior council managers, has used InstantAtlas to create an online map that shows the current state of devolution in England.

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Across the country, councils are joining up to create new combined authorities – new organisations which will be given additional powers and resources by the government, especially if they are prepared to accept an elected mayor.

LGC has conducted in depth research by speaking to local politicians and council officers to find out the current position in each area. But the title sought a novel way of using mapping software to show what the situation is around the country in a single map…

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Colorado’s Accountability in Colorado Elections (ACE) map wins plaudits ahead of award decision

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Colorado’s ACE program are winning plaudits from media as well as experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Minnesota ahead of the National Association of Secretaries of State’s Innovation, Dedication, Excellence and Achievement in Service awards which will be announced in July.

This could be the third win a row for the state which has developed a first-of-its-kind electronic warehouse of elections-related information. Colorado used InstantAtlas to develop an interactive website which uses InstantAtlas to display quantitative and qualitative election data, making it freely available to the public. As well as voting behaviour of its 3.5 million active and inactive registered voters, interactive maps charts and tables include information on voting method, compliance with legal requirements, vote credit based on registered party affiliations, election costs and two types of voter registration statistics.

“I am so proud of our office, which continues to lead the nation on so many fronts, from online business registrations to election awards,” Secretary of State Wayne Williams said. “We really are an innovative state agency.”

View the ACE Dashboards

Additional information

Creating a global atlas for rheumatic heart disease data in an easily accessible format using graphs, maps and tables

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Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a preventable, treatable form of cardiovascular disease that affects over 32 million people around the world and claims 275,000 lives annually. It affects the world’s poorest, most vulnerable populations and imposes heavy costs on the health systems that can least afford it. If left untreated, RHD can lead to heart valve damage, stroke, heart failure, and death. Treatment of advanced disease requires costly surgery unavailable in many parts of the world.

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